Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Enrollment

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  • Dairy Management
  • Farm Business Management
  • Field Crops
  • Livestock & Small Farms

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  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
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  • On-Farm Research Trials

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Soil

SoilEffectively managing the soils of western New York for long-term productivity and sustainability is the foundation for crop production in New York's bread basket. This page contains resources and information to help farmers manage their soils and the nutrients used to grow their crops.

A wide range of soils are farmed in western New York. Heavy clays sit on limestone bedrock along the Niagara Escarpment in Niagara and Orleans counties. Southern Wyoming, Livingston, Yates, and Seneca counties have acidic glacial loams. Highly productive loam soils are alongside heavy clays and gravelly sands, throughout the region and sometimes even in the same field. Muck soils naturally contain high levels of organic matter, while mineral soils vary greatly in their organic matter content depending on management history. Practices that increase soil health and productivity such reduced tillage, cover cropping, tile drainage, and diverse crop rotations continue to be adopted by western New York farmers.

Western New York farmers have been very proactive by adopting practices such as manure injection, nutrient management planning, split fertilizer applications, conservation tillage, and precision nutrient management in order to protect the natural resources they live near while increasing their productivity. While many farms make use of manure which contains many nutrients, farmers also typically apply nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, and sulfur fertilizers along with lime to their fields. These fertilizers are placed with the crop seed as a "pop-up", 2 inches to the side and below the seed as a "starter", deep banded with tillage equipment, broadcasted on the soil surface, and occasionally applied as a foliar fertilizer. On-farm research by the NWNY Team continues to help farmers fine-tune their fertilizer applications to their crop rotations and tillage systems.





Most Recent Soil Content

Reducing the Risk of Compaction When Grazing Cover Crops

Nancy Glazier, Small Farms & Livestock
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: October 31, 2019
Reducing the Risk of Compaction When Grazing Cover Crops

The benefits of cover crops have been known for many

years; one is remediating compaction. 


Crop Alert

Mike Stanyard, Team Leader, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: July 27, 2018
Crop Alert

Timely observations, information, and control strategies for managing pests, fertility, and current conditions on northwestern NY farms.


Forage Congress - Presentations

Nancy Glazier, Small Farms & Livestock
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: March 14, 2017
Forage Congress - Presentations

New to the NWNY Team's lineup this winter was Forage Congress at the Genesee River Restaurant and Reception Center in Mount Morris, NY.

This event covered timely topics recommended by the region's producers. The morning's session began with an overview of the cropping plan from the ground up, economics of high fiber digestibility, and new alfalfa varieties with quality grasses. The afternoon covered double cropping with winter triticale and options for properly storing silages. 

Entry Point Precision Ag Technology: Benefits & Costs for Decision Making

John Hanchar, Farm Business Management
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: March 15, 2016
Entry Point Precision Ag Technology: Benefits & Costs for Decision Making

Two benefits attributed to auto steer mentioned frequently by producers and their advisors are reduced stress and reduced fatigue. Combine these benefits with expected favorable economic and financial impacts, and auto steer has the potential to be a beneficial change in practice for farmers, one that farmers will likely want to evaluate for their business.

Manure Injection vs. Surface Application

John Hanchar, Farm Business Management
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: September 23, 2015
Manure Injection vs. Surface Application

Owners of dairy farm businesses face numerous challenges as they manage manure to meet financial, environmental, and other farm business objectives; trade-offs and conflicting objectives describe the situation. What is the expected change in profit associated with the change to manure injection from surface applicatin followed by incorporation?

Crop Cam

Mike Stanyard, Team Leader, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: September 9, 2015
Crop Cam

Tune in as the NWNY Teams' Extension agronomists put on their GoPro cameras and head to the field.




Crop Cam 9-01-15  White Mold in Soybeans, Mike Stanyard in Ontario County.
Crop Cam 6-17-15  Scouting Soybean Aphids Mike Stanyard in Ontario County.
Crop Cam 6-05-15  Scouting Black Cutworm in Field Corn Mike Stanyard in Orleans County.
Crop Cam 5-29-15 Identifying Flowering Stage of Wheat Mike Stanyard in Monroe County.
Crop Cam 5-15-15 Alfalfa Weevil Larvae Scouting Mike Stanyard in Ontario County.
Crop Cam 5-14-15 Winter Triticale Forage Harvest Mike Stanyard in Wayne County.
Crop Cam 4-27-15:Comparing two winter malting barley fields. Bill Verbeten in Niagara County.
Crop Cam 4-6-15:  Estimating wheat tiller counts per square yard. Mike Stanyard in Ontario County.
Crop Cam 3-20-15:Evaluating winter malting barley. Bill Verbeten in Niagara County.

Cover Crop Options in 2015

Mike Stanyard, Team Leader, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: August 7, 2015
Cover Crop Options in 2015

Winter grain harvest should be just about wrapped up. That leaves a lot of open ground out there to plant some cover crops. We also ended up with quite a few prevented planting corn and soybean acres this spring. Some of that ground will go into winter small grains like wheat, rye and barley this fall. If you do not grow winter grains in your rotation, it is a good opportunity to get that ground covered up. There is also an opportunity to grow some more forage acres. This wet growing season has not been stellar for corn production. Crops like sorghum, forage oats and triticale can help fill in some of those forage losses. The past couple of years have shown us that the first half of August has been the optimal planting window for success of most cover crops.

Pop-Up and Starter Fertilizers in Corn and Soybeans

Bill Verbeten, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: March 4, 2015
Pop-Up and Starter Fertilizers in Corn and Soybeans

Curious about applying pop-up or starter fertilizer to corn and soybeans? Check out this AgFocus article from May of 2013.

Proposed FAA Drone Rules Released

Bill Verbeten, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: February 24, 2015
Proposed FAA Drone Rules Released

On Sunday February 15th, 2015 the FAA released it's proposed rules for commercial unmanned aerial systems (UAS), commonly called drones, for public comment for 60 days. A summary can be found in the PDF below.

FAQs about Farm Drones

Bill Verbeten, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: December 22, 2014
FAQs about Farm Drones

Have a question about using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) on your farm? Not sure what is and isn't legal for drone use on your land? Check out this PDF for more information.

Safely Handling & Storage of Anhydrous Ammonia

Bill Verbeten, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: September 11, 2014
Safely Handling & Storage of Anhydrous Ammonia

Thinking about using anhydrous ammonia? Be sure to download and read this safety fact sheet first before buying, handling, storing, or applying this fertilizer.

Planting Winter Triticale, Malting Barley, Wheat, & Rye

Bill Verbeten, Field Crops
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: August 21, 2014
Planting Winter Triticale, Malting Barley, Wheat, & Rye

As corn silage, soybeans, and corn grain come off during September and October many winter small grains will be planted in northwestern NY. This article reviews the similarities and differences for current planting recommendations of winter triticale, malting barley, wheat, and rye. 





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Dairy

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Livestock

Grazing

Grazing

Forages

Forages

Grains

Grains

calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Corn Congress - Batavia Location

Event Offers DEC Credits

January 6, 2021
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Batavia, NY

Please join the NWNY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crop Team for our annual Corn Congress.  DEC re-certification points and Certified Crop Adviser credits available, so bring your picture ID.  Lunch is included.  Hear from program-related professionals and visit with our sponsoring vendors.  
view details

Corn Congress - Waterloo Location

Event Offers DEC Credits

January 7, 2021
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Waterloo, NY

Please join the NWNY Dairy, Livestock and Field CropsTeam for our annual Corn Congress. DEC re-certification points and Certified Crop Adviser credits available, so bring your picture ID. Lunch is included. Hear from program-related professionals and visit with our sponsoring vendors. 
view details

Soybean & Small Grains Congress - Batavia Location

Event Offers DEC Credits

February 10, 2021
8:30a.m Registration. Program 10:00am - 3:30pm
Batavia, NY

Please join Cornell Cooperative Extension's NWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Team for the annual Soybean & Small Grains Congress to be held at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY.
view details

Announcements

Resources for Managing Overtime

Beginning January 1, 2020, farm employers in New York will be required to pay overtime to certain employees for all hours worked over 60 in a week. We've developed some tools to help farm employers consider management strategies to respond to this change. Tools include an excel calculator to estimate the cost of overtime and an extension bulletin to help you consider and evaluate changes on your farm.

March 2020 Dairy Market Watch

The latest issue of Dairy Market Watch is now available. Keep up to date on the market issues affecting our dairy industry, and put changing market forces into perspective.

https://nydairyadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_730.pdf

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry.  Dairy Market Watch is published at the end of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Business Management Specialist with CCE's SWNY Regional Team.



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