Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Dairy Management
  • Farm Business Management
  • Field Crops
  • Livestock & Small Farms

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Ag Focus Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

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  • Issues of Ag Focus Newsletters
  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
      What's wrong with my crop?

Resources

ResourcesWe have compiled a list of useful resources for farmers, consultants and agri-business professionals, organized by category. We hope that these websites can provide you with additional information and guidance.



GENERAL

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE)

The Cornell Cooperative Extension website provides an overview of CCE programs across New York State.

http://cce.cornell.edu


Cornell Nutrient Management Spear Program

The vision of the Cornell University's Nutrient Management Spear Program is to assess current knowledge, identify research and educational needs, conduct applied, field and laboratory-based research, facilitate technology and knowledge transfer, and aid in the on-farm implementation of beneficial strategies for field crop nutrient management, including timely application of organic and inorganic nutrient sources to improve profitability and competitiveness of New York State farms while protecting the environment. For more information about our program activities see our latest (3-2-2013) Program Report.

http://nmsp.cals.cornell.edu/


What's Cropping Up

Newsletter for New York Field Crops and Soils

http://css.cals.cornell.edu/cals/css/extension/cropping-up/index.cfm


Cornell Field Crops Home Page

Providing timely field crops, soil and pest management information to the agricultural community of New York State.

http://www.fieldcrops.org/Pages/Home.aspx


NYS IPM Program

Developing sustainable ways to manage pests and help people to use methods that minimize environmental, health, and economic risks.

http://www.nysipm.cornell.edu/


The Cornell Nutrient Analysis Laboratory

Provide accurate and cost effective analysis of soil (Cornell Soil Health Test, Illinois Soil Nutrient Test, other specialized soil tests), plant and water samples.

http://cnal.cals.cornell.edu


Cornell Soil Health

Information to help you return your soil to a healthy state or keep an already good soil productive.

http://soilhealth.cals.cornell.edu


Precision Agriculture

An excellent website for Precision Agriculture Resources.

http://www.aces.edu/anr/precisionag/


BUSINESS

Cornell Small Farms Program

http://www.smallfarms.cornell.edu


NE Beginning Farmer Program

http://nebeginningfarmers.org/


GUIDELINES

Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management

http://ipmguidelines.org/FieldCrops/Default.aspx



Dairy

Dairy

Livestock

Livestock

Grazing

Grazing

Forages

Forages

Grains

Grains

calendar of events

Upcoming Events

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Announcements

1st Cutting Forage Quality Update

We are into the third week of monitoring 1st cutting for quality this year. Our procedure consists of using alfalfa height to predict Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDF) for alfalfa, alfalfa/grass mixed and grass stands. Alfalfa height has proven to be a reliable indicator of NDF values in the field.

Height indicators alfalfa and grass for NDF content are below:

In general we say 100% grass stands should be cut when nearby alfalfa is 14 inches tall to achieve the desired 50% NDF.

Begin cutting 50/50 mixed alfalfa and grass stands when nearby alfalfa is 22 inches tall for the desired 44% NDF.

Begin cutting 100% alfalfa stands when alfalfa is 28 inches tall for desired 40% NDF.
  
Predicted days to cut are based on daily NDF increases for grasses of 1% point, 50/50 mixed stands of 0.8% points and alfalfa of 0.5% point. NDF usually increases about 0.8 to 1.2/day for grasses expecting the lower end of that range in cooler weather and the higher end in warmer. Alfalfa NDF increases about 0.4 to 0.7/ day again depending on temperatures. Predictions are adjusted for the coming week’s weather and right now assuming normal growth.

In the attached spreadsheet locations around the region are listed where we have measured alfalfa height. You can use the location and elevation as a guide to conditions that may be similar to your farm.

The 2017 hay crop is ahead of 2016 first cutting. For 2017 on May 17, 2017 the alfalfa averaged 20 inches tall and only 2% of the fields were 18 inches or less. Triticale and grass fields should be knocked down at this point otherwise you will be losing quality. It is important that you get first cutting off in a timely manner, so if it comes down to making a choice between planting corn or getting first cutting, opt for the first cutting. The warmer summer weather may help the corn but you can’t get first cutting quality back and you may lose the advantage of adequate soil moisture to gain a quality second harvest.

Mixed stand harvest should start by the weekend with pure alfalfa stands (28 inches for desired 40% NDF) to follow a week later.

Click here for spreadsheet



Latest Dairy Market Watch

An educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. How to Read Dairy Market Watch. Dairy Market Watch -  April 2017

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