Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Dairy Management
  • Farm Business Management
  • Field Crops
  • Livestock & Small Farms

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Ag Focus Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

Enrollee Login

Password:

Log In To Access:

  • Issues of Ag Focus Newsletters
  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
      What's wrong with my crop?

Forages

ForagesIn western New York high yields of high quality forage are vital to the dairy and livestock industries. Feed-costs are often half of a farm's business expenses each year. This page contains resources and information to help farmers better manage silage, hay, and pastures. 

Corn silage and "haylage" (alfalfa or alfalfa/grass silage) are the main forages grown on dairy farms. These silages are stored in upright silos, bunker silos, piles, silage bags, and as "balelage" (plastic-wrapped round bales) where they are persevered and then fed to the cows. In recent years winter triticale silage has also become an important feed on dairy farms due to increasing land prices, short feed supplies, and winter triticale's high yields and desirable feed quality. Oats are also grown for silage as a nurse crop during the establishment of a haylage field or, in more recent years, as a fall silage planted in August after another small grain or vegetable crop. Hay is widely grown in the region for horses, beef, alpacas, sheep, goats, and dairy animals. Most of the hay is sold to local farmers and animal owners. 

However a number of farmers contract out of the state for specialty hay markets (racing horse, mushroom production, biomass, etc.). Much of the hay grown is a mixture of alfalfa with timothy or orchardgrass, but other grass species like tall fescue, reed canarygrass, bromegrasses, and ryegrasses are also planted on many farms. Pastures are very common in western New York and form the foundation of many productive dairy and livestock farms. Ladino clover, red clover, white clover, and/or birdsfoot trefoil are mixed orchardgrass, tall fescue, meadow fescue, reed canarygrass, timothy, bromegrass, and/or ryegrass on most farms. Many graziers have adopted rotational grazing practices that have increased pasture productivity by grazing small paddocks for a short period of time and then allowing that area to recover for 25-40 days before grazing again.


FORAGES CATEGORIES




Most Recent Forages Content

Webinar for Dairy Producers will Cover New Dairy Margin Coverage Program

John Hanchar, Farm Business Management
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: June 10, 2019

The USDA/Farm Service Agency in New York is partnering with the NYS Crop Insurance Education Program to present a webinar for dairy producers.


Alfalfa Height Measurement updated weekely

Last Modified: May 9, 2019
Alfalfa Height Measurement updated weekely

Locations around the region are listed where we have measured alfalfa height (see spreadsheet). You can use the location and elevation as a guide to conditions that may be similar to your farm.

The 2019 hay crop season is shaping up to be similar to our 2018 harvest schedule. An alfalfa height of 9 inches or less is too low to be used by the equation we have which is why you see "Too Early." On May 2, 2018 the alfalfa averaged 7 inches tall and as of today, May 2, 2019, alfalfa is averaging 7 inches tall.

The table below indicates no grasses are ready to be cut today. The continued temperature fluctuations along with rain will influence how much growth we get in another week so stay tuned! Soil temperatures are ranging between 38 and 46 degrees in places.

 It is important that you get first cutting off in a timely manner for quality purposes, so please communicate in advance with your team on how you are going to plant corn and successfully harvest 1st cutting.  Additional fields to be added to next report.

Week 2, Updated May 9, 2019:

County Town Road Name Elevation Alfalfa Height Inches Predicted Grass     % NDF Predicted 50/50 Mix % NDF Predicted Alfalfa       % NDF Predicted Date to Cut Grass  Predicted Date to Cut Mix  Predicted Date to Cut Alfalfa 
Monroe Scottsville Cameron RD 620 11 46.5 33.7 26.2 5/5/19 5/14/19 5/25/19
Wyoming Castile Glen Iris RD 1340 11 46.5 33.7 26.2 5/5/19 5/14/19 5/25/19
Livingston Geneseo Lakeville-Groveland RD 850 12 47.4 34.5 26.9 5/4/19 5/13/19 5/24/19
Orleans Medina Seaman Rd 525 7 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early
Orleans Lyndonville County line rd 322 10 45.6 32.8 25.5 5/6/19 5/16/19 5/27/19
Ontario Hopewell County rd 4 860 13 48.2 35.4 27.6 5/3/19 5/12/19 5/22/19
Yates  Penn Yan Field Lane 364 1000 12 47.4 34.5 26.9 5/4/19 5/13/19 5/24/19


Week 1, May 2, 2019

County Town Road Name Elevation Alfalfa Height Inches Predicted Grass              % NDF Predicted 50/50 Mix % NDF Predicted Alfalfa            % NDF Predicted Date to Cut Grass  Predicted Date to Cut Mix  Predicted Date to Cut Alfalfa 
Monroe Scottsville Wheatland Center RD 620 7 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early
Wyoming Castile Glen Iris RD 1340 7 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early
Livingston Geneseo Groveland RD 850 7 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early
Livingston Geneseo Chandler RD 870 7 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early
Ontario Hopewell Spangle Rd 860 7 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early
Ontario Hopewell Spangle Rd 740 7 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early
Seneca Waterloo Yellow Tavern Rd 590 8 Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early Too Early


 


Winter Feeding Beef Cows

Nancy Glazier, Small Farms & Livestock
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: February 14, 2019
Winter Feeding Beef Cows

Winter is a challenging time to feed the beef herd. Mud, cold and snow or rain can stress your cows and increase their nutritional needs. How do you know if you are meeting the needs of your herd?






Dairy

Dairy

Livestock

Livestock

Grazing

Grazing

Forages

Forages

Grains

Grains

calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Pasture Walk - Wild Geese Farm - Franklinville, NY

August 21, 2019
5:30pm - 8:30pm
Fanklinville, NY

Topics to include: Tools for Managing Rotational Grazed Pasture, Weed ID and Management and Calculating Cost of Production. 
view details

Bovine Reproduction and AI Training Course

September 24 - September 25, 2019
9:30am - 3:30pm
Shortsville, NY

This two-day AI workshop will be held on September 24 and 25. 

Topics covered will include:

• Reproductive Physiology
• Synchronization Protocols
• Heat Detection
• Artificial Insemination
• Proper Thawing of Semen
• Loading A.I. guns
• Practice Breeding Cows

view details

Corn Congress - Batavia Location

Event Offers DEC Credits

January 8, 2020
10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Batavia, NY

Please join the NWNY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crop Program's team for our annual Corn Congress.  DEC re-certification points and Certified Crop Adviser credits available, so bring your picture ID.  Lunch is included.  Hear from program-related professionals and visit with our sponsoring vendors.  
view details

Announcements

2019 NY Corn & Soybean Yield Contests - Entries Due 8/30/19

The annual corn and soybean yield contests sponsored by the New York Corn & Soybean Growers Association are underway. Click Here for the 2019 yield contest entry form.  This form and contest rules can also be found on the NY Corn & Soybean Growers Association web page at: https://nycornsoy.org/ 

Entry forms must be postmarked by Friday, August 30 and mailed or emailed to Mike Stanyard. Cost is $30 per entry. Good Luck! 


Preventing Sexual Harassment on Farms

If you're wondering how to get your farm business in compliance with NYS Sexual Harassment Regulations, you've come to the right place.  This is a recording of the presentations given at the live training on July 30 and July 31, 2019 across New York State, which provides updates and farm-specific resources developed by CCE. View the recording here: https://youtu.be/_1IjmAj1Nb8.

RMA Announces Additional One-time Changes to Prevented Planting Provisions

June 29, 2019

RMA Announces Additional One-time Changes to Prevented Planting Provisions
for 2019 Crop Year

In response to delayed and prevented planting resulting from above average rainfall and wetness, the USDA Risk Management Agency has made a one-time change to the 2019 crop year prevented planting rules that effectively allows silage corn, if planted as a cover crop following local agricultural expert guidelines, to be acceptable as a post-prevented planting cover crop. Under this one-time rule change, producers are allowed to produce this crop while retaining their prevented planting payment. This change couples with previously announced one-time changes to the prevented planting rules - including expanded acceptable uses for post-prevented planting cover crops and a change in the cover crop haying and grazing start date rule - serve to help those struggling to meet their forage needs due to the weather.

Read the full article from the New York Crop Insurance Education Program.

The USDA-RMA states that "For crop insurance purposes, a cover crop is a crop generally recognized by agricultural experts as agronomically sound for the area for erosion control or other purposes related to conservation or soil improvement." PRO-DAIRY specialists Joe Lawrence and Karl Czymmek and Dr. Quirine Ketterings, Professor and Director of Cornell Nutrient Management Spear Program have released a letter stating "Corn on Prevented Planting acres meets these objectives."


NEWSLETTER   |   CURRENT PROJECTS   |   IMPACT IN NY   |   SPONSORSHIP  |  RESOURCES   |   SITE MAP