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Pate Visit a Success!

Nancy Glazier, Small Farms & Livestock
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

September 30, 2014
Pate Visit a Success!

The National Beef Quality Assurance program offered to assist with expenses to bring stockmanship expert Curt Pate to NY. I am a member of the state committee and quickly volunteered for the task of driving him around the Finger Lakes for 2 days. As time wore on, I became a bit more hesitant. To spend 2 days with a stranger was a little bit unnerving. I think there was a bit of apprehension on his part, too. 
It wasn't long after I picked him up at the hotel near the Rochester airport my concerns were laid to rest. I soon discovered his passions ? family, small farms, grazing, and animal welfare. I could easily relate. He said the gently rolling hills Finger Lakes reminded him of Sweden. The green grass (and everything else!) reminded him of Ireland. I explained things aren't always this green here in August. 
Curt has a wide background working with animals. His grandfather had an auction barn and slaughterhouse. He grew nostalgic at a stop at one of the sale barns. His values came from that time since he grandfather demanded horses and cattle be treated humanely. That stuck with him when he started working horses and then cattle. At all of the clinic stops, Curt took his time getting started with the training. He 'read' the audience and tailored each presentation to the group. He worked dairy or beef cattle at each clinic, which is the format he prefers. He does not use PowerPoint presentations. The toughest crowd was at one of the sale barns working with the employees. He skipped the presentation and we went out to the holding facilities. The employees were in their environment and more willing to talk. Ideas were developed to make the facilities better for both employees and animals. A hot topic was touched upon and will need some further work to remediate. 
Curt is very concerned with consumers perception of animal agriculture. We always need to keep the industry moving forward towards transparency. A quality of life is important for the farmer and livestock. He says it is our duty to care for them and they in turn provide for us. We need to protect them from fear and being alone. Animals have a high tolerance for pain, but we need to protect them from any unnecessary pain. Livestock need to be read before they are worked. Curt took the time to watch them before entering the pens or barns. He moved towards them with confidence and firm pressure. Livestock can sense hesitancy and timidity. All animals have a flight zone, or he liked to call it pressure point. That zone or point was the basis for movement. He 'hooked on' the cattle; he worked to get them to pay attention only to him, gauging the pressure needed for more sensitive ones. 
Curt referenced the Five Freedoms for confined animals at one of our clinics. It sums up a lot of what he believes. It was originally reported in the Brambell Report (1965) and further developed by the Farm Animal Welfare Council (FAWC) in 1979: 1. Freedom from Hunger and Thirst - by ready access to fresh water and a diet to maintain full health and vigour. 2. Freedom from Discomfort - by providing an appropriate environment including shelter and a comfortable resting area. 3. Freedom from Pain, Injury or Disease - by prevention or rapid diagnosis and treatment. 4. Freedom to Express Normal Behaviour - by providing sufficient space, proper facilities and company of the animal's own kind. 5. Freedom from Fear and Distress - by ensuring conditions and treatment which avoid mental suffering. 
At our last clinic at Rita Partee's Fleur de lis Farm, he said we need to step back and take a look at the day. Did we do things right or could we have done things better. That's a great way to end every day!


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calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Corn Congress - Batavia Location

Event Offers DEC Credits

January 6, 2021
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Batavia, NY

Please join the NWNY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crop Team for our annual Corn Congress.  DEC re-certification points and Certified Crop Adviser credits available, so bring your picture ID.  Lunch is included.  Hear from program-related professionals and visit with our sponsoring vendors.  
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Corn Congress - Waterloo Location

Event Offers DEC Credits

January 7, 2021
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Waterloo, NY

Please join the NWNY Dairy, Livestock and Field CropsTeam for our annual Corn Congress. DEC re-certification points and Certified Crop Adviser credits available, so bring your picture ID. Lunch is included. Hear from program-related professionals and visit with our sponsoring vendors. 
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Soybean & Small Grains Congress - Batavia Location

Event Offers DEC Credits

February 10, 2021
8:30a.m Registration. Program 10:00am - 3:30pm
Batavia, NY

Please join Cornell Cooperative Extension's NWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Team for the annual Soybean & Small Grains Congress to be held at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY.
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Announcements

Resources for Managing Overtime

Beginning January 1, 2020, farm employers in New York will be required to pay overtime to certain employees for all hours worked over 60 in a week. We've developed some tools to help farm employers consider management strategies to respond to this change. Tools include an excel calculator to estimate the cost of overtime and an extension bulletin to help you consider and evaluate changes on your farm.

March 2020 Dairy Market Watch

The latest issue of Dairy Market Watch is now available. Keep up to date on the market issues affecting our dairy industry, and put changing market forces into perspective.

https://nydairyadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_730.pdf

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry.  Dairy Market Watch is published at the end of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Business Management Specialist with CCE's SWNY Regional Team.



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