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Calf Care for Variable Months

Libby Eiholzer, Bilingual Dairy
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: June 10, 2013
Calf Care for Variable Months

Fall has arrived, and with it a tricky time of year for calves. Though the weather is getting progressively colder, temperatures can fluctuate from one week to the next and especially from morning to night. On a 70°F day, it can be easy to forget the possibility that the temperature could dip low enough to make young calves suffer overnight.

For calves younger than three weeks of age, the thermoneutral temperature is about 50-80°F. This means that in that temperature range the heat produced by the calf's body is enough to make up for the heat that she loses. When the temperature gets below 50°F, she has to burn extra energy to make up for the heat that she's losing, so her maintenance cost goes up. The more energy used for maintenance, the less energy available for growth and immune function. And since calves are born with very little body fat, they don't have much extra energy to burn off before they actually start to starve!

So what can you do to keep calves healthy this fall? First and foremost, keep them warm and dry. Get newborn calves dry as quickly as possible, and provide them with adequate dry bedding. Putting calf jackets on the smallest calves can help prevent heat loss as well. A calf keeps warm with a jacket on a chilly fall day. La becerra no siente el frio de un día otoñal con su chaqueta.

Don't forget cleanliness! When calves are too cold, they are more apt to get sick. Dip calves' navels with iodine, separate them from adult cows as quickly as possible after birth and keep cow manure away from them. Rinse milk pails and bottles with lukewarm water, and then wash them thoroughly with hot soapy water. Always provide plenty of clean, fresh grain and water.

El Cuidado de los Becerros Durante Unos Meses Variables
Ya llegó el otoño, lo que es un tiempo difícil para los becerros. Aunque la temperatura está bajando progresivamente, las temperaturas pueden cambiar mucho de una semana a la otra y especialmente de la mañana a la noche. Durante un día de 70°F (21°C), se puede olvidar fácilmente de que la temperatura podría bajar bastante para que los becerros chiquitos sufran por la noche.

Para los becerros menos de tres semanas de edad, la zona termoneutral es 50-80°F (10°-27°C). Eso quiere decir que entre estas temperaturas, el calor producido por el cuerpo del becerro es bastante para compensar el calor que pierde. Cuando la temperatura baja a menos que 50°F (10°C), el becerro requiere energía extra para recuperar el calor que pierde, así que el costo de mantener su temperatura corporal sube. Al gastar más energía para mantenerse, hay menos energía para crecer y para protegerse de las enfermedades. Como los becerros nacen sin mucha grasa corporal, no tienen mucha energía extra para gastar antes de empezar a sufrir de la malnutrición.
 
¿Qué puede hacer usted para que estén sanos sus becerros este otoño? Para empezar, deben estar siempre secos y nunca deben tener frio. Hay que secar los becerros recién nacidos lo más pronto que sea posible y darlos bastante cama seca. Ponerlos chaquetas a los becerros más chiquitos también puede prevenir la pérdida de calor corporal.

¡No se les olviden la limpieza! Cuando los becerros tienen frio, es más posible que se enferman. Moje los ombligos de los becerros con yodo, sepárelos de las vacas adultas lo más pronto que sea posible después del parto y no dejen que tengan contacto con el estiércol de las vacas adultas. Enjuague las cubetas y botellas de leche con agua tibia, y después lávelas con agua caliente y jabón. Siempre deben tener bastante agua y grano fresco y limpio.

Calf Care El Cuidado de los Becerros
Dip the calf’s navel Moje el ombligo del becerro
Separate the calf from the cow quickly Quite el becerro de la vaca rápidamente
Put a jacket on the calf Ponga una chaqueta al becerro
Put dry sawdust/straw in the pen Ponga aserrín/paja seca al corral
First rinse the milk pails with lukewarm water Primero, enjuague las cubetas de leche con agua tibia
Then wash the pails with hot water and soap Después, lave las cubetas con agua caliente y jabón

 





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Upcoming Events

Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Training - Newfane, NY

November 9, 2019
10:00AM - 1:00PM
Newfane, NY

Becoming BQA certified allows you to share your story and ensure consumers that you are responsibly raising safe, wholesome and healthy beef. 
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*NEW* Automated Milking System (AMS) Management Discussion Group - Homer, NY

November 12, 2019
5:30pm - 8:00pm
Homer, NY

Milk Quality Management in AMS systems will be our first topic, with future discussion group topics to include: lameness and cow comfort, milk production, AMS daily task efficiency, and AMS maintenance. 
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*NEW* Automated Milking System (AMS) Management Discussion Group - Ellicottville, NY

November 13, 2019
5:30pm - 8:00pm
Ellicottville, NY

Milk Quality Management in AMS systems will be our first topic, with future discussion group topics to include: lameness and cow comfort, milk production, AMS daily task efficiency, and AMS maintenance. 
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Announcements

Showcasing Energy Efficiency Technologies on the Farm

Van Lieshout Dairy Farm Open House


When: Friday October 25th, 10am-noon

Location: Van Lieshout's Dairy Farm, 4775 Oak Orchard Road, Albion, NY 

Please Join us for a morning of presentations and tours at the Van Lieshout Dairy Farm in Albion, NY, as we highlight energy efficiency upgrades and resources available to NY Farmers.

By participating in NYSERDA's Agriculture Energy Audit Program, the Van Lieshout Dairy Farm received a no-cost energy audit. Equipped with the results of the energy audit, the Van Lieshout Dairy farm worked with National Grid to install robotic milking equipment and other energy efficient equipment.

National Grid's Energy Efficiency and Economic Development programs provided approximately $90,000.00 of funds to the project. By purchasing highly efficient products, the Van Lieshout's will save an estimated 311,000 kWh per year, which equates to approximately $31,000.00 per year in electrical costs.

Hear directly from the Cindy Van Lieshout about her family's experience with various programs and services they used to help the farm become energy efficient and sustainable. The Van Lieshout Dairy Farm, a third-generation family owned and run operation, has been in business since 1978. Investing in energy efficiency and making these upgrades will better position Cindy's son, Garrett to manage the business in the future as the current generation prepares to retire in a few years.

The Van Lieshout's completed a Cornell Dairy Farm Business Summary on an annual basis to assess their business and plan for a sustainable future. For this project, they used Pro-Dairy's Dairy Acceleration Program, now known as the Dairy Advancement Program, funded through New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets to cost share their facility engineering.

Representatives from NSYERDA, National Grid, and Cornell Cooperative Extension will be on hand to answer questions and provide additional information.

Attendees will have the opportunity to tour the newly installed equipment. Light Refreshments will be provided.
For more Information Contact:
Lisa Coven at lisac@ensave.com 800-732-1399
Margaret Quaassdorff at maq27@cornell.edu 585-405-2567
Jay Snyder at John.Snyderjr@nationalgrid.com 716-517-5515


Preventing Sexual Harassment on Farms

If you're wondering how to get your farm business in compliance with NYS Sexual Harassment Regulations, you've come to the right place.  The 2018 New York State budget included new regulations addressing sexual harassment in the workplace that became effective on October 9, 2018 for all New York employers, including agricultural employers. All employers are required to have a sexual harassment prevention policy and to provide annual, interactive sexual harassment prevention training for all employees.  Check out the resources developed by Cornell Ag Workforce Development, including step-by-step instructions and farm-friendly training videos.


RMA Announces Additional One-time Changes to Prevented Planting Provisions

June 29, 2019

RMA Announces Additional One-time Changes to Prevented Planting Provisions
for 2019 Crop Year

In response to delayed and prevented planting resulting from above average rainfall and wetness, the USDA Risk Management Agency has made a one-time change to the 2019 crop year prevented planting rules that effectively allows silage corn, if planted as a cover crop following local agricultural expert guidelines, to be acceptable as a post-prevented planting cover crop. Under this one-time rule change, producers are allowed to produce this crop while retaining their prevented planting payment. This change couples with previously announced one-time changes to the prevented planting rules - including expanded acceptable uses for post-prevented planting cover crops and a change in the cover crop haying and grazing start date rule - serve to help those struggling to meet their forage needs due to the weather.

Read the full article from the New York Crop Insurance Education Program.

The USDA-RMA states that "For crop insurance purposes, a cover crop is a crop generally recognized by agricultural experts as agronomically sound for the area for erosion control or other purposes related to conservation or soil improvement." PRO-DAIRY specialists Joe Lawrence and Karl Czymmek and Dr. Quirine Ketterings, Professor and Director of Cornell Nutrient Management Spear Program have released a letter stating "Corn on Prevented Planting acres meets these objectives."


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