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Colostrum: Quantity, Quality and Timeliness

Libby Eiholzer, Bilingual Dairy
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: June 10, 2013

We all know that feeding calves adequate amounts of high quality colostrum, and feeding it fast, is an essential part of getting them off to a good start. But do your employees understand just how critical this is? Share this refresher course on colostrum management with your Spanish-speaking employees, and brush up on your own Spanish so that you can get the message across.

Colostrum is the milk produced by cows prior to calving. It contains key nutrients to promote healthy growth, such as protein, vitamins, minerals and energy, as well as antibodies (or immunoglobulins, IgGs) to prevent disease. Since the calf's ability to absorb IgGs decreases quickly after birth, it is important to feed colostrum as soon as possible. Standard recommendations are to feed 4 quarts of colostrum within the first few hours after birth. You should strive to feed at least 50% of calves within the first hour after birth, which is the time in which they can most efficiently absorb IgGs.

While quantity and timing of colostrum feeding are important, quality should certainly not be forgotten. If possible, IgG levels should be measured using a Colostrometer to ensure that the antibody concentration is sufficient. Since colostrum provides a great medium for bacteria growth, utmost care should be taken to sanitize all containers (buckets, bottles, nipples, tubers, etc.) between uses and to cool colostrum quickly after milking if it will not be fed immediately.

Below you will find a few easy phrases to help you communicate the importance of high quality colostrum for healthy calves.

Calostro: Cantidad, Calidad y Puntualidad
El calostro es la leche producida por la vaca inmediatamente antes del parto. Contiene nutrientes claves como proteína, vitaminas, minerales y energía para promover un crecimiento sano, además anticuerpos (también conocidas como inmunoglobulinas o IgGs) para prevenir las enfermedades. Como la capacidad de la becerra de absorber las IgGs disminuye rápidamente después del nacimiento, es importante darla calostro lo más pronto como sea posible. La recomendación estándar es dar un galón de calostro dentro de las primeras horas después del nacimiento. Debe esforzarse dar de comer a por lo menos 50% de las becerras dentro de una hora después del nacimiento, como eso es el tiempo en que pueden absorber las IgGs con más eficiencia.
 
Mientras la cantidad y la puntualidad de la alimentación de calostro son importantes, no hay que olvidar la calidad. Si es posible, midan el nivel de IgGs con un Calostrometer para asegurar que el nivel de anticuerpos es suficiente. Como el calostro es un buen caldo para el cultivo de bacterias, hay que siempre desinfectar todos los envases (cubetas, botellas, biberones, tubos, etc.) después de cada uso y enfriar el calostro rápidamente después del ordeño si no lo van a usar inmediatamente.
 
Aquí se puede encontrar unas frases fáciles para ayudarle a comunicar sobre la importancia de calostro de alta calidad para becerras sanas.

Colostrum Handling El Manejo del Calostro
Always cover the colostrum pail Siempre tape la cubeta de calostro
Put the colostrum in the refrigerator Ponga el calostro en el refrigerador
Measure the IgGs in the colostrum Mida el nivel de IgGs en el calostro
Feed the calf quickly after birth Dela de comer rápidamente después del nacimiento
Feed the calf a gallon of colostrum Dé la becerra un galón de calostro
Disinfect the bottle Desinfecte la botella

Reference:
Leadly, Sam. Calf Facts. 



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Upcoming Events

Beginning Farmer/Hobby Farmer Workshop $5/pp, class size is limited, so pre-register by April 15th!

April 27, 2019
9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Canandaigua, NY

This hands-on workshop is for beginning or part-time farmers who would like to improve their farm machinery skills, learn to properly and safely maintain their equipment to protect their investment. If you have been thinking about buying a tractor, new or used, two-wheel or four-wheel drive, compact or utility or more come join us. Topics include: selecting the right size/type tractor for the job; basic maintenance; staying safe around tractors and equipment; attaching implements properly; and information about ROPS and SMV's. There will be time for questions.

Pre-registration requested by April 15, 2019 email Amy with your name, address, and phone number or call 585-394-3977 x 429.
Fee: $5.00/person. Class size is limited.

2019 Pastured Poultry Seminar, lunch included so please register by May 10th! $25/person

May 18, 2019
Registration begins at 8:00 a.m.w/ coffee & donuts with the Program running from 9:00 a.m. - 5 p. m.
Attica, NY

The main speaker this year is Eli Reiff of Mifflinburg Pennsylvania. Eli raises broilers, turkeys, sheep, and beef, all on pasture. Topics to be covered will include the pasture, feed and nutrition, marketing, costs, and much more. As we grow as farm operators and get bigger, we may not pay as much attention to the basics as we should. So those areas are where we will start, and then expand to cover the group's interests.

Mike Badger, Director of the American Pastured Poultry Producers Association will also be available for a round-table discussion. Plans are to have representatives from Farm Bureau, NYCAMH for farm health and safety, Wyoming County Chamber of Commerce, and Cornell Cooperative Extension of Wyoming County, as well as others.

Calling all 9th-12th graders! 4th Annual Precision Agriculture Day at Genesee Community College

May 21, 2019
9:00 am - 1:30 pm Register by Friday May 10th! $15/per person includes lunch
Batavia, NY

Calling all 9th-12th graders!  We have an exciting new program for students interested in technology, science, engineering, and agriculture!
Would you like to:
  • Learn about how Drones collect information
  • Check out some potential career opportunities that have new and ever-changing technology
  • Learn how these technologies can be used in our own backyards in WNY
  • Discover potential and exciting career opportunities

Announcements

Producers Previously Enrolled in the LGM Program Now Eligible for MPP

Dairy Producers Previously Enrolled in the Livestock Gross Margin Program Now Eligible for 2018 Margin Protection Program
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that dairy producers who elected to participate in the Livestock Gross Margin for Dairy Cattle Program (LGM-Dairy) now have the opportunity to participate in the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy) for 2018 coverage. Sign-up will take place March 25 through May 10, 2019.
Eligible producers can enroll during the sign-up period at their local USDA service center. To locate your office, visit farmers.gov.


Smart Farming Team Technical Assistance Grant Application

The Labor Ready Farmer Project is offering grants to provide up to 12 hours of Technical Assistance (TA) consulting services to farms who want to make improvements to their farm's processes in hiring, training, managing or evaluating employees. Applicants will choose from one of the following four areas for TA assistance and identify a specific project. If selected they will be matched with a "Smart Farming Team" of consultants who will provide one on one technical assistance.
  • HIRING EMPLOYEES 101 - GETTING OFF TO A GOOD START
  • ONBOARDING & TRAINING EMPLOYEES QUICKLY AND EFFECTIVELY
  • FINE-TUNING & IMPROVING THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT
  • H2-A READINESS
Please complete this application and send to Nicole Waters, Beginning Farm Project Coordinator for the Cornell Small Farms Program. The form can be submitted by email, mail or in-person at the address listed below. Please feel free to call or email with any questions.

Nicole Waters - Beginning Farmer Project Coordinator
Plant Science Building, Room 15b
Tower Road, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
Phone: 607-255-9911
Email: nw42@cornell.edu

Applications accepted on a rolling basis.



USDA Announces January Income over Feed Cost Margin Triggers First 2019 Dairy Sa

WASHINGTON, March 6, 2019 ? The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency (FSA) announced this week that the January 2019 income over feed cost margin was $7.99 per hundredweight, triggering the first payment for eligible dairy producers who purchase the appropriate level of coverage under the new but yet-to-be established Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program.

DMC, which replaces the Margin Protection Program for Dairy, is a voluntary risk management program for dairy producers that was authorized by the 2018 Farm Bill. DMC offers protection to dairy producers when the difference between the all milk price and the average feed cost (the margin) falls below a certain dollar amount selected by the producer.

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced last week that sign up for 
DMC will open by mid-June of this year. At the time of sign up, producers who elect a DMC coverage level between $8.00 and $9.50 would be eligible for a payment for January 2019.

For example, a dairy operation with an established production history of 3 million pounds (30,000 cwt.) that elects the $9.50 coverage level for 50 percent of its production could potentially be eligible to receive $1,887.50 for January.

Sample calculation:
$9.50 - $7.99 margin = $1.51 difference
$1.51 times 50 percent of production times 2,500 cwt. (30,000 cwt./12) = $1,887.50

The calculated annual premium for coverage at $9.50 on 50 percent of a 3-million-pound production history for this example would be $2,250.

Sample calculation:
3,000,000 times 50 percent = 1,500,000/100 = 15,000 cwt. times 0.150 premium fee = $2,250

Operations making a one-time election to participate in DMC through 2023 are eligible to receive a 25 percent discount on their premium for the existing margin coverage rates.

"Congress created the Dairy Margin Coverage program to provide an important financial safety net for dairy producers, helping them weather shifting milk and feed prices," FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce said. "This program builds on the previous Margin Protection Program for Dairy, carrying forward many of the program upgrades made last year based on feedback from producers. We're working diligently to implement the DMC program and other FSA programs authorized by the 2018 Farm Bill."

Additional details about DMC and other FSA farm bill program changes can be found at farmers.gov/farmbill.


New Guidance for Mortality Disposal Issued

NYS Department of Ag and Markets has posted guidelines on disposal of livestock carcasses, in response to reports that some rendering companies have halted pickups from farms.

https://nwnyteam.cce.cornell.edu/submission.php?id=761&crumb=dairy|1